Introduction

By binding the Mac OS X computers in your school to a Mac OS X Server, you can create a rather simple and yet powerful workstation/server environment. In a typical setup, all user’s documents, preferences, etc will follow that person on any computer they use because all that information will be stored to the server (without training for the end-user). By having documents and preferences stored on the server, you don’t need to worry about backing up individual computers. The only data that will be stored on the individual computers will be the system software and the application programs.

Before binding workstations to a server, the server should meet these minimum requirements.

  • Teachers and students have accounts on the server.
  • The server is configured with a share point that stores home directories.
  • Preferences within Workgroup Manager have been defined.
  • If intending to use Portable Home Directories, the server needs to be running Mac OS Server 10.4 or later.
  • Automatic login has been disabled on the workstations. (This is in the Accounts pane of System Preferences.)
  • If any workstations are running Mac OS 10.3, the search base is required (eg: dc=stmarystcloud,dc=org).

Binding Mac OS 10.5 workstation to a server running Mac OS 10.3 or newer.

  1. Launch Directory Utility on the workstation. (Located in the Utilities folder.)
  2. If the lock in the lower-left corner is closed, click the lck and authenticate as the local administrator.
  3. Click the plus (+) symbol.
  4. Declare the type as Open Directory.
  5. Type the server’s IP address or domain name.
  6. Click OK.
  7. Quit Directory Utility.
  8. Restart the computer.

Binding Mac OS 10.4 workstation to a server running Mac OS 10.3 or newer.

  1. Launch Directory Access on the workstation. (Located in the Utilities folder.)
  2. If the lock in the lower-left corner is closed, click the lock and authenticate as the local administrator.
  3. Highlight LDAPv3, but make sure not to uncheck it!
  4. Click Configure….
  5. Click New….
  6. Type the server’s IP address or domain name.
  7. Click Continue.
  8. If prompted to enter the server’s username/password, simply click Continue.
  9. Click OK.
  10. Click OK.
  11. Click Apply.
  12. Quit Directory Access.
  13. Restart the computer.

Binding Mac OS 10.3 workstation to a server running Mac OS 10.3 or newer.

  1. Launch Directory Access on the workstation. (Located in Utilities folder.)
  2. If the lock in the lower-left corner is closed, click the lock and authenticate yourself as the local administrator.
  3. Highlight LDAPv3, but make sure not to uncheck it!
  4. Click Configure…
  5. Click the triangle by Show Options to expand your options.
  6. Click New…
  7. Type a configuration name. This can be anything you want, such as the name of the server.
  8. Type the server’s IP address or domain name in the appropriate field.
  9. Under LDAP Mappings, select From Server.
  10. At the prompt, type the search base of your server (eg: dc=stmarystcloud,dc=org).
  11. Click OK.
  12. Click the Authentication tab.
  13. Change the Search menu to read Custom path.
  14. Click Add…
  15. Highlight /LDAv3/……………………… and then click Add.
  16. Click the Contacts tab.
  17. Change the Search menu to read Custom path.
  18. Click Add…
  19. Highlight /LDAPv3/…………………….. and then click Add.
  20. Click Apply.
  21. Quit Directory Access.
  22. Restart the computer.

Binding Mac OS 10.2-10.4 workstations to Mac OS Server 10.2

  1. Launch Directory Access on the workstation. (Located in Utilities folder.)
  2. If the lock in the lower-left corner is closed, click the lock and authenticate yourself as the local administrator.
  3. If NetInfo is not already checked, please place a checkmark next to it now.
  4. Highlight NetInfo, but make sure not to uncheck it!
  5. Click Configure…
  6. Check Attempt to connect to a specific NetInfo server:
  7. Type your server’s IP address in the appropriate field.
  8. Type the this server tag: nework (lowercase).
  9. Quit Directory Access.
  10. Restart the computer.